Argentine Beauticians Give Chemo Patients A Reason To Look In The Mirror

Argentina Cancer Beauty.jpg

 

For cancer patients dealing with the physical and psychological trauma of the disease, even looking in the mirror can be difficult. When chemotherapy robs your hair, it’s common to feel that a part of your identity goes missing as well.

Cancer is the second-leading cause of death in Argentina, after heart disease, and the country’s cancer mortality rate is the third highest in Latin America after Cuba and Trinidad and Tobago.

“Look Good Feel Better” is a program that offers free lessons in makeup and skin care, with tips on covering heads gone bald and using eye-liner to replace fallen eyebrows.

It’s an opportunity for beauticians to share their skills, for companies to donate products and for people with cancer to find some hope.

The idea began 25 years ago in the U.S., where more than 700,000 women have participated, and it has spread to Argentina and 23 other countries where chemotherapy is increasingly common. Argentina was the first Latin American nation to launch it, in 1999, and it has since grown to 100 sites across the country.

For Mariela Steinberg, 38, it has made all the difference. She’s had multiple surgeries in a yearlong fight with uterine and cervical cancer, and was shocked at first to look in the mirror.

“You see a face but you don’t recognize it as your own. But now I can say, little by little, I am beginning to adapt,” she said during a two-hour class. “All of a sudden I begin to recognize myself. I am made-up, beautified.”

Cancer is the second-leading cause of death in Argentina, after heart disease, and the country’s cancer mortality rate is the third highest in Latin America after Cuba and Trinidad and Tobago, the Pan American Health Organization says.

Staying optimistic is known to increase the odds of survival, and appearance can have an outsized impact. Thus the program’s theme, “Hope is beautiful.”

Daiana Castro, a 23-year-old hairstylist with ovarian cancer, was traumatized at first. “I had red hair, beautiful and long, and when it fell out I didn’t leave the house for a week.”

Then she sought out one of the classes at Hospital San Martin. “If you have makeup on, you feel better. It helps you not to feel down,” Castro said.

Makeup tips include techniques for covering extremely dark circles, creating the impression of eyelashes, drawing on eyebrows where none remain, and wrapping headscarves so they won’t slip off smooth skin.

Psychiatric oncologist Gabriela Ozco says the program is a key part of holistic treatments.

“At first, they don’t want to look in the mirror,” she said. “It’s one of the first symptoms that we’ve noticed with patients. And the fact is that in such workshops one of the first things they do is get them looking in the mirror. So they are faced with, ‘This is who I am,’ and from there on, it’s all about getting better.”

Turkey becomes a destination for people seeking fertility treatments

 

Turkey has become the preferred destination for couples from the Middle East, Eastern Europe and even the United States who seek in vitro fertilization so they can have babies.

The secret of success: a cutting-edge technology comparable to that of the best European and American clinics at prices up to five times cheaper…and a welcoming atmosphere.

“Five years ago my husband and I wanted to have kids, and though we’re both fertile, I could only get pregnant through assisted fertilization, a treatment that in the United States costs some $16,000 for having it done just once,” Sarah Flores Sievers, director of a public health program in Santa Fe, New Mexico, told Efe.

“We faced a dilemma: do we pay our mortgage and our bills or do we have a baby?” Sievers said.

Even something as simple as a vaginal sperm injection, according to her husband, Fletcher Sievers, costs between $2,500 and $3,000 in the United States.

For that price a patient in Turkey can get the most advanced in vitro fertilization technology with a 40 to 55 percent rate of success, Bulent Tiras, head doctor of the fertility treatment unit at Acibadem Hospital in Istanbul, said.

Most of his patients are Turks, but Tiras estimates that from 10 to 15 percent come from abroad, mostly from Eastern Europe and the Balkans where the technology is less developed, as well as from Arab countries and Central Asia. EFE

A Little Bit Of Wine Never Hurt

Benefits of red wine

Red Wine

French paradox
The “French paradox” is the observation that the French experience low levels of coronary heart disease despite a high-saturated fat diet. Many nutritionists have speculated that the consumption of red wine as a prominent component to French culinary culture may explain this apparent paradox.

Physician Julie B. Damp reported, “There are multiple observational studies suggesting moderate consumption of alcohol is associated with decreased incidence of cardiovascular disease, including lower risk of heart attacks.” Moderate means one 5-ounce glass for women per day and one to two 5-ounce glasses for men per day.

Other alcohol
Other sources of alcohol share some of the positive effects of red wine. According to registered dietician Amanda Bontempo, all sources of alcohol can increase the cardio-protective blood marker, HDL-cholesterol.

Furthermore, registered dietician Alison Massey suggested that the ethanol may be responsible for the benefits to counter atherosclerosis, — a condition characterized by a thickening of the artery wall.

Resveratrol
Resveratrol is found in red grape skins and appears to be the source of red wine’s health benefits. It may prevent fat accumulation and reduce insulin resistance, which lowers the risk of diabetes.

Resveratrol also prevents blood clotting and plaque formation in arteries while improving vascular function. Bontempo explained, “The bio-active chemicals found only in red wine are flavanoids, polyphenols and specifically resveratrol which act as anti-inflammatories and antioxidants to prevent harmful cellular damage.”

Anti-cancer activity
But that’s not all resveratrol has done. Studies have shown this molecule can reduce tumor incidence by targeting different stages in cancer development.

“It may prove anti-carcinogenic by inhibiting certain enzymes, promoting cancer cell death, and preventing the development of blood vessels needed to feed a tumor,” Bontempo said. Interestingly, grapes grown in cool climates have higher concentrations of resveratrol.

Reservations
Keep in mind that you can get the same health benefits elsewhere. Flavonoids, for instance, are found in other foods (fruits and vegetables), cocoa and some juices. Grapes and red grape juice also have many of the same components as red wine.

People with high triglyceride levels — which is associated with heart disease and diabetes — should limit alcohol consumption because this can raise those levels even higher.

Wine also contains empty calories, which can lead to weight gain.

“Drinking greater amounts of alcohol is associated with negative health effects such as increased cancer risk, liver disease, high blood pressure, heart failure and addiction,” Damp said.

Damp suggested that some of the associated benefits of alcohol consumption may be, in part, related to healthy lifestyle choices — such as nutritious diets and physically active schedules — on the part of moderate consumers. One should never overlook physical activity and maintaining a healthy weight when trying to improve overall health.

 

 

Today I Met An Angel (Cancer Awareness)

Today I met an Angel. Her name ? Kelsey Hunnicutt. I know what your thinking , Just another sob story about a disease that kills thousands around the World. But, this story is a little different. Kelsey is ONLY 17… & Bless her heart as beautiful as can be. A few months ago I over heard someone talking about her. Unaware of who she was I blew it off. Today though , Was different for me. Kelsey and her grandmother came in to my work to eat. Not knowing who she was I smiled and simply greeted them. They both ate and began to leave. As they left I saw a hospital bracelet on the table… I began to read the name on the bracelet. It read “Kelsey Hunnicutt.” This is the girl who is losing her life to cancer? The one EVERYONE everywhere is talking about. My stomach dropped as tears came into my eyes. She’s younger than me, & yet she has her life to worry about. Where I’m always complaining about Bills, New shoes & how my hair NEVER looks right. WE ALL can be ungrateful. & I know bills are important , BUT this young lady simply smiled the whole time. It was definitely a tired smile… But it was a SMILE! How could I be so selfish. Here I am looking at someone who may not make it to Christmas , & if she does, Want be able to FULLY enjoy it. But getting to my point of this hole thing We all have struggles. We all have our bad days & our not so bad days. We all strive to be perfect. What about the kids who aren’t so lucky? What about the children in hospitals who can’t even make it out on thier own. This really does bother me. Any other time i’d get a tad bit emotional but i’d blow it off. THIS TIME though has me wanting to do something, Anything ! To help people like Kelsey ! Please find it in your heart to pray for her, & others that share this life taker. She has a Facebook page and a fundraising page !

 

Fundraising website : http://www.youcaring.com/medical-fundraiser/kelsey-s-fight/89867

Facebook page : https://www.facebook.com/pages/Team-Kelsey/579354775458773

*PLEASE DONATE MONEY, WRITE LETTERS OF ENCOURAGEMENT. ANYTHING TO BRIGHTEN Kelsey’s DAY*

 

-Thank you, & I as well will be praying for this young girl. She truely inspires me to want to help not only her but every other child. The description below is the one they have on her facebook page. TEAM KELSEY

 

About

This is a support page for Kelsey Hunnicutt. She was recently diagnosed with osteosarcoma, a type of bone cancer.
Description

This is a support page for Kelsey Hunnicutt. She was recently diagnosed with osteosarcoma, a type of bonecancer most commonly found on children, young adults and athletes. She is a senior in high school and has been a cheerleader all four years, but this year she won’t be able to cheer due to her condition. She is a very strong girl and we know that she can beat this cancer but a little support never hurt anyone. We are currently working on a few different things for her and if anyone is interested, feel free to contact us. Please keep this sweet girl in your prayers! And remember #dontgiveupkelsey

 

 

Thanksgiving Menu

collard and brussels sprout salad

Collard & Brussels Sprout Salad
             
  • 4 slice(s) (or up to 6 slices) thick-cut bacon, diced
  • 1 1/2 pound(s) collard greens, stems removed, cut into thin strips
  • 12 ounce(s) Brussels sprouts, shaved or sliced paper-thin
  • 1 cup(s) grated Parmesan
  • Mustard Vinaigrette (recipe follows)
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground pepper

Mustard Vinaigrette

  • 1/4 cup(s) sherry vinegar
  • 1/4 cup(s) extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon(s) fresh lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon(s) Dijon mustard
  • 1/2 teaspoon(s) kosher salt
  • Freshly ground pepper, to taste

Directions

  1. In a skillet over medium heat, cook bacon until brown and crispy. Transfer to a paper-towel-lined plate to drain.
  2. In a large bowl, combine collard greens, Brussels sprouts, Parmesan, and reserved bacon. Toss with mustard vinaigrette. Season with salt and pepper before serving.
  3. To make the vinaigrette: Whisk together sherry vinegar, olive oil, fresh lemon juice, Dijon mustard, honey, kosher salt, and freshly ground pepper to taste.
 
 
sage butter roasted turkey
Sage Butter Roasted Turkey
                       Ingredients    
  • 2 lemons, sliced
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • 1 1/2 cup(s) kosher salt
  • 1/2 cup(s) sugar
  • 1 tablespoon(s) whole peppercorns
  • 1 (12- to 15-pound) fresh turkey
  • 1/2 stick(s) butter, cut into 8 slices
  • 8 fresh sage leaves
  • 2 tablespoon(s) olive oil
  • 3 carrots, cut into 2-inch pieces
  • 3 stalk(s) celery, cut into 2-inch pieces
  • 2 onions, quartered
  • Freshly ground pepper
  • Gravy (recipe follows), if desired

Gravy

  • Turkey drippings, in roasting pan
  • 2 tablespoon(s) all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup(s) chicken broth
  • Kosher salt, to taste
  • Freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • 2 tablespoon(s) butter
  • 1/2 teaspoon(s) fresh thyme leaves

Directions

  1. In a stockpot large enough to hold the turkey, over high heat, bring 2 cups water, lemon slices, salt, sugar, and peppercorns to a boil. Remove pot from heat and add 2 gallons ice water and lemon juice. Submerge the turkey, cover the pot, and refrigerate for at least 6 hours or up to overnight.
  2. Remove the brined turkey and rinse under cold water. Transfer turkey to a wire rack, with paper towels placed underneath, to drain; dry the skin with paper towels.
  3. Run your fingers under the turkey’s breast and thigh skin to loosen. Work butter slices and sage leaves under the skin. Dry the skin again with paper towels, then rub with oil.
  4. Place carrots, celery, and onions in a shallow roasting pan; place turkey in the center. Sprinkle with pepper. Refrigerate for at least 2 hours or up to overnight. Remove from the refrigerator 2 hours before cooking.
  5. Preheat oven to 450 degrees F. If any liquid has collected in the roasting pan, remove it with a baster. Tuck the turkey wings underneath the bird and tie the legs together with kitchen twine. Place the turkey in the oven. Lower the temperature to 350 degrees F. Roast for 1 hour, then baste with pan juices. (If breast is browning too quickly, cover with foil.) Rotate the pan and continue to roast, basting turkey every 30 minutes, until an instant-read thermometer reaches 165 degrees F when inserted into the thickest part of the thigh, 21/2 to 3 more hours.
  6. Transfer turkey to a cutting board and let rest 30 minutes before carving. Reserve drippings for gravy, if desired.
  7. To make the gravy: Add flour to drippings in roasting pan and cook over medium heat, scraping up the browned bits from the bottom of the pan, until the mixture turns a rich brown, 5 to 8 minutes.
  8. Slowly add chicken broth and stir until gravy thickens, adding more broth if needed. Add kosher salt and freshly ground pepper to taste.
  9. Stir in butter until it melts. Add fresh thyme leaves, if desired.
 
cornbread dressing
Cornbread Dressing
Ingredients
  • 3/4 stick(s) butter
  • 3 cup(s) (about 2 large onions) chopped onions
  • 2 cup(s) (about 6 stalks) chopped celery
  • 3/4 teaspoon(s) kosher salt, plus more to taste
  • 1/4 teaspoon(s) freshly ground pepper, plus more to taste
  • 7 cup(s) day-old cornbread, broken into 1-inch cubes (see Cast-Iron Buttermilk Cornbread recipe)
  • 2 tablespoon(s) minced fresh sage
  • 2 cup(s) chicken or vegetable broth

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Meanwhile, in a 12-inch cast-iron skillet over medium heat, melt 1 tablespoon butter. Add onions, celery, salt, and pepper; cook until slightly softened, 3 to 5 minutes. Transfer to a large bowl, and add cornbread and sage. Mix well.
  2. In the same skillet over medium heat, melt 3 tablespoons butter. Add cornbread mixture. Add broth and stir to moisten. Dot with remaining butter, and season with salt and pepper to taste. Bake until brown and crispy on top, 40 to 50 minutes.
 
 
citrus cranberry sauce
 
Citrus Cranberry Sauce
 
  • 1 1/2 cup(s) sugar
  • Juice and zest of 1/2 orange
  • Juice and zest of 1/2 red grapefruit
  • 1 pound(s) cranberries (frozen or fresh), rinsed

Directions

  1. In a medium saucepan over high heat, bring sugar and 1 cup water to a boil. Add fruit juices and zests, and return mixture to a boil. Add cranberries; reduce heat to medium and cook until cranberries pop, 10 to 12 minutes. Chill.
skillet green beansSkillet Green Beans
Ingredients
 
  • 1 pound(s) green beans, ends trimmed
  • 1 tablespoon(s) soy sauce
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon(s) sesame oil

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Meanwhile, in a large cast-iron skillet, toss green beans with soy sauce and sesame oil. Roast, tossing midway through, until just crispy, 15 to 20 minutes.
 
 
potato gratin
 
Potato Gratin
Ingredients
 
  • 2 tablespoon(s) butter
  • 4 clove(s) (large) garlic, peeled
  • 2 cup(s) milk
  • 2 cup(s) heavy cream
  • 2 teaspoon(s) kosher salt, plus more to taste
  • 3 pound(s) (about 4 large potatoes) russet potatoes
  • Freshly ground pepper
  • 3 cup(s) shredded Gruyère

Directions

  1. Butter a 2-quart casserole dish or enamel-coated cast-iron skillet, then rub with 1 garlic clove. Discard garlic.
  2. In a large saucepan over medium-high heat, combine milk, cream, salt, and remaining garlic. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to low and simmer for 5 minutes. Remove garlic and discard.
  3. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Meanwhile, peel and rinse the potatoes. Pat dry with a paper towel, then cut into 1/8-inch-thick slices.
  4. Overlap the potatoes in a circular pattern to cover the bottom of the dish. Top with 1/4 cup of the milk mixture, a few grinds of pepper, a sprinkle of salt, and 3/4 cup cheese. Repeat process (reserving 1/2 cup of the cheese) until layers are 1/2 inch from the top of the dish. Pour additional milk mixture up to top of potatoes (you may not need to use all of it). Top with the reserved cheese.
  5. Place the dish on a foil-lined baking sheet and bake until casserole is bubbling, cheese is brown, and a knife easily pierces the potatoes, 30 to 45 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool for 10 to 12 minutes before serving.

10 Holiday Crafts You’ll Love

red and white pillows

 

Joyful Pillows

Upgrade store-bought throw pillows in a jiffy with simple appliqués. To make them, type JOY into a word-processing document, using a font you like. Enlarge each character to full letter-page size. Print, then cut out the letters and trace them onto white felt; cut out. Next, pin strips of fusible bonding web, such as Stitch Witchery ($2.99; joann.com), to the back of each felt letter. Center each one (with webbing underneath) on a pillowcase and carefully remove the pins. Iron on according to the package instructions. Once the letters have adhered, add decorative stitching with embroidery thread, if desired.

 
 
hannukah menorah craft

Hannukah Menorah Craft

Arrange a memorable menorah in minutes! Who knew plain old salt and pepper shakers could look so sophisticated? Simply unscrew the tops, fill each shaker with decorative blue sand, and place a menorah candle inside. Once the candles melt down, use tweezers to remove residual wax before reusing.
 
 
glass ornaments
 

Upgrade a Plain Glass Ornament

At around a dollar each, these empty orbs offer an affordable catalyst for creativity. Fill one with small wooden chips, another with a single stunning peacock feather (attached to the ornament’s top with hot glue). Or compose a more obvious Christmas scene by dropping a model fir tree into a globe dusted with artificial snow. You can also use tweezers to position branches inside and even hot-glue a tiny cardinal in place.

(Ornaments, starting at $4.99 for four, and cardinal, $1.99; michaels.com for stores. Peacock feathers, $2.99 for three, and artificial snow, $2.99; joann.com. Wood chips, $3 for 4.8 ounces; walmart.com for stores. Model tree, from $2.99; hobbylinc.com)

 

Christmas Tree Skirt

A literal take on the Christmas tree skirt, this resourceful project makes clever use of old duds gathering dust in your closet. All you need are two kilts (or other pleated skirts) in complementary colors and a little sewing know-how. For instructions, visit countryliving.com/tree-skirt.
 
 
 
 

Snow Globes

For a cooler-than-cool stocking stuffer, create a mini winter wonderland with a snow-globe kit ($13.95 for two; snowdomes.com). Here’s how to get the ball rolling:

Step 1: Decide what you’d like to put in your globe (we chose cupcake toppers from fancyflours.com), keeping in mind that plastic and ceramic work best underwater.

Step 2: If desired, cover your globe’s base. Since ours feature outdoor scenes, we used sheets of model-train “grass” ($2.49; modeltrainstuff.com), adhered with waterproof epoxy. Spray with Watco’s clear lacquer ($7.99; woodcraft.com); let dry.

Step 3: Position your figure on the base; affix with the epoxy.

Step 4: Once the epoxy has dried, attach the dome to the base and fill with distilled water and the included snow, following the kit’s instructions. To hide the seam where the base and dome meet, use glue dots to affix a decorative ribbon around the globe’s circumference. Looks like it’s a small world, after all.

 
w Thumbnails

Crafty Kits

Instead of a single present, treat loved ones to a customized kit packed with stuff they’re sure to use — buttons, thread, and needles for a friend who likes to sew; polishes, brushes, and buffing cloths for a well-dressed dad; or cookie cutters, sprinkles, and icing tubes for a friend who bakes. To re-create these kits, start by spraying a clean tin (we used old metal cookie containers) with Rust-Oleum Universal All-Surface paint in white; let dry. Next, download an image to match the tin’s contents at countryliving.com/dec-templates. Print the silhouette and cut out, then spray the back with adhesive. Using a pair of craft tweezers, pick up the graphic and place it, right side up, on the tin’s lid. Once it dries, coat the lid and base with a spray sealer (try Krylon’s Make It Last) and let dry. Use black card stock, cut to the tin’s dimensions, to create dividers, if desired. Then fill with your goodies
 
 

Enjoy some good clean fun with these easy-to-make soaps, shaped using animal-themed cookie cutters ($3.99 for six; ikea.com for stores). For your own menagerie, heat a medium-size chunk of melt-and-pour glycerin ($6 for two pounds; sweetcakes.com) over a double boiler or in the microwave. While it melts, place the cutters in a deep metal baking pan. Once the glycerin liquefies, tint it with food coloring, then pour it in the middle of each cutter so the glycerin fills it to the top (use only one soap color per pan, in case any spills over). Spray with rubbing alcohol and let sit until the glycerin hardens. Using a knife, cut around the inside of the cookie cutter, then gently press the soap through to release it. Wild!

 
 
 

A sweet alternative to store-bought cards, these greetings put your tree-decorating skills to work — on a small scale. Download our illustration at countryliving.com/dec-templates, and print in color onto 8 1/2- by 11-inch card stock. Fold the stock in half lengthwise, creasing with a bone folder. For the card at top left, attach small bugle beads and paillettes to the tree (use craft glue for all designs). To replicate the middle version, cut out ornaments (made by tracing a button), a tree base, and a star from patterned fabrics and adhere. Make the last card by zigzagging a length of ribbon across the tree. Fold the ends under and glue, then try other widths of ribbon to craft a base, star, and gift. Or use your imagination, and whatever supplies you have on hand, to make your own one-of-a-kind cards.

 
 
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